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Why we love Fair-Trade Cotton


organic clothing kids

Cotton is the world’s oldest commercial crop and one of the most important fibre crops in the global textile industry.

Although world cotton production is dominated by China, India and the US, cotton is vital for the survival of many low income countries in Central and West Asia and Africa – it accounts, in value terms, for 26.4 per cent of Benin’s exports and 58.7 per cent of Burkina Faso’s.

Cotton farmers in developing countries, including leading producers like India and China, live in hardship. As many as 100 million households are directly engaged in cotton production and an estimated 300 million people work in the cotton sector when family labour, farm labour and workers in ancillary services such as transportation, ginning, baling and storage are taken into account. For farmers, the challenges range from the impact of climate change, poor prices for seed cotton, through to competition from highly subsidised producers in rich countries and poor terms of trade. In particular, government subsidies for cotton farmers in rich countries, particularly the US, create a market with artificially low prices that small-scale farmers are unable to compete in.

Fairtrade cotton was launched to put the spotlight on these farmers who are often left invisible, neglected and poor at the end of a long and complex cotton supply chain. Through tools like the Fairtrade Minimum Price and an additional Fairtrade Premium and stronger, more democratic organisations, Fairtrade has sought to provide these farmers with an alternative route to trade and higher, more stable incomes.

ABOUT COTTON

Complex issues in the global cotton industry mean millions of small-scale farmers are struggling to make a decent living from growing cotton.
Why do cotton farmers remain poor?

With high levels of illiteracy and limited land holdings, many cotton farmers live below the poverty line and are dependent on middle men or ginners who often buy their cotton at prices below the cost of production.

Rising costs of production, fluctuating market prices, decreasing yields and climate change are daily challenges, along with food price inflation and food insecurity. In West Africa, a cotton farmer’s typical smallholding of 2-5 hectares must provide the essential income to cover basic needs such as food, healthcare, school fees and seeds and tools. A small fall in cotton prices can have serious implications for a farmer’s ability to meet these needs. In India many farmers are seriously indebted because of the high-interest loans needed to purchase fertilisers and other farm inputs and have, in desperation, resorted to ending their lives. The notorious complexity of the cotton and textile supply chain means that farmers have little power to negotiate with others in the chain to secure better prices.

But in addition to these problems that plague most smallholder farmers, the situation in cotton is worse because the global cotton trade is heavily distorted by subsidies given to cotton farmers including in rich countries like the US and EU.

These subsidies totalled a record $10.35bn in 2014-15, led by China with subsidies worth $8.2bn. Cotton producers in Turkey were paid $508m while US cotton farmers received subsidies for crop insurance premiums amounting to $490m. Government subsidies create a market with artificially low prices that farmers in developing countries are unable to compete in and allow the US to export its cotton at a lower price than cotton produced in West Africa or India.

How does Fairtrade make things better?

Fairtrade works with the small-scale cotton farmers in Asia and Africa and helps build stronger farmer-owned organisations. This is important because farmers can achieve a lot more together as a group in negotiations with ginners and traders or in supporting the local community.

Fairtrade encourages sustainable cotton production and is the only standard to provide economic benefits, through a guaranteed Fairtrade Minimum Price and additional Fairtrade Premium for seed cotton farmers. In 2014, 22 farmers’ organisations in 7 countries were certified for Fairtrade cotton production and reported Premium earnings of approximately £800,000. A large percentage of this was invested in providing farmers with tools and inputs and supporting education and healthcare facilities in the local community.

Through Fairtrade, thousands of cotton farmers have already improved their lives. Cotton co-operatives have become better organised, farmers are more productive and women farmers are receiving the same rewards as male farmers, from voting rights to equal pay. A study on the impact of Fairtrade cotton in four countries particularly noted the impact of Fairtrade Standards on gender equity. The study highlighted how a requirement in the Fairtrade Standards for seed cotton stipulating that women farmers should be paid directly (rather than through their husbands or other male family members) had encouraged more women in West and Central Africa to cultivate cotton. They considered that this had given them more influence over their household resources.

Boosting Fairtrade cotton sales for farmers
Fairtrade currently works with almost 55,000 cotton farmers in some of the poorest regions in the world. In 2014 Fairtrade certified producer organisations sold an average of 43 per centof their production volumes on Fairtrade terms, much higher than in previous years. Meanwhile, globally, 90 million small-scale cotton farmers are all in need of a fairer deal for their cotton. There’s still a lot more that Fairtrade can do.

The Fairtrade Cotton Program therefore unlocks exciting new opportunities for businesses to buy more cotton on Fairtrade terms and expand market access under Fairtrade terms for more farmers. The new model recognises that businesses want to use more Fairtrade cotton in their manufacturing of clothing and textiles, rather than create a specific Fairtrade branded cotton range. Read more about the Fairtrade Cotton Program.

In the words of G S Rao, state coordinator of Fairtrade certified organic baby clothes in UK,

‘Buying a fairly traded garment is not giving to charity, but is much more a positive statement of fulfilling ones commitment towards all the people who are ultimately responsible for the garment. Fairtrade has helped Chetna to lay additional focus on setting up farmers’ institutions and building their capacities on leadership and self-sustainability. Other certifications do not focus on building producers’ institutions and yet, this is the key to long-term sustainability. With setting up of farmers’ institutions, involvement of women has also slowly started to increase, though there is still a long way to go.’

If you are looking to buy organic baby clothes online visit our online Organic Kids Clothes Store UK.

official source:- https://www.tillyandjasper.co.uk/blogs/news/why-we-love-fair-trade-cotton

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drivers-education

Positive Thoughts for a Driving Instructor


Every day the news we hear suggests that the future for Driving Instructors is truly bleak. Lack of driving lessons, fewer learner drivers, driving lessons Indooroopilly being canceled. One thing is certain, if you do believe it, the future for Driving Instructors will be bleak.

There is an alternative. If you change your thoughts, you can change your beliefs to see that there are opportunities to create more driving lesson inquiries and potential pupils, even in the bleakest times. You will discover that only the best leaders have discovered – that being positive opens you up to possibilities and can improve your outcomes.

Difficult times are when your business acumen skill is truly tested and your ability to maintain a positive attitude towards your driving lessons and learner drivers and use all your creative and caring qualities can make a real difference.

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If You Take These 9 Actions Today and Repeat Them Every Day, You’ll Begin to See Things Differently

  1. Only think positive thoughts
  2. Maintain an attitude towards your customers that exudes enthusiasm
  3. Know your financial numbers and be realistic about cash, lesson prices (do you need to reduce the cost of your lessons?)
  4. Do everything you know to book more lessons: contact pupils you’ve not heard from in a while, contact any pupils who owe you money, reduce some of your work areas and distances you might go for a new learner driver, reduce your lesson prices, make a special offer to your pupils.
  5. Hold on to current pupils by adding value to your driving lessons – how long is it since you really looked at your teaching methods, are they up to date?
  6. Watch other driving instructors in your area, listen to what they tell you, work out their failings and ensure you are unique in your teachings and approach.
  7. Take the opportunity to improve your teaching skills, when was the last time you read a driving book or joined a course to help with your teaching skills
  8. Are there any creative ideas that can get you noticed? Is your car branded? Do you have a website?
  9. Join a local Driving Instructor group that could bring some external wisdom to your challenges, visits online forums to exchange ideas.
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